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Narrator:

Hello, who are you? ... It doesn’t matter. Welcome. You are safe with me. I’ll be right here, nice and close so I can speak without alerting the others. Let me tell you about Senua. Her story has already come to an end but now, it begins anew.



(It’s breathing. The head is breathing. She’s getting closer. Dillion.)



This is a journey deep into darkness. There will be no more stories after this one.



(They can feel you coming. They’re coming.)



Senua:

Shh...quiet.



Narrator:

Oh how rude of me. I never told you of the others... You hear them too, right? They’ve been around ever since the tragedy.



Well...that’s not quite true. Some are old, some are new, but they’ve...changed. I think the darkness changed them just like it changed her.



Look. Up ahead. You see it too? Yes, it is real after all. She has finally arrived in the land of mist and fog. The place the northmen call Hel.



(Go back. It’s not safe. They’re here.)



Look around and you will see them. The drowned, the sick, the slain. Here they lie, rotting in the field and rivers of Hel. But the dead don’t always lie still here. This is not a place of rest.



(Can you see them? They’re going to do that to you!)



(Can you feel them watching? They’re watching her.)



What is she thinking? I can tell you. She is afraid. Wouldn’t you be? You’d think she would get used to it by now after so many years. But the darkness...it just builds onto itself, growing stronger, towering over her.



You might try and ignore it, turn away, but it’s always there just out of sight, where you are most vulnerable. It’s like it knows that just enough light...is all you need to see it’s suffocating power.



(They can feel you. They know you’re here.)



You might think she’s brave to go on this journey on her own. But it isn’t bravery that drives her. Bravery only means something to those afraid of death. Senua’s fear runs far, far deeper.



What is she looking at? What is she leaving behind? I know what she’s thinking. I hear her thoughts.



(She wants to go back! She’s scared. Go back!)



It’s not too late to get into the boat and go back. No one will judge her, no one will ever know.



Oh! She heard us...



Senua:

There’s no going back.



Narrator:

(Idiot! You’re so stupid!)



Senua pushes away a world that conspired to cause so much suffering. There is nothing to go back to and worse to look forward to. Why don’t you join us. Maybe you too have a part to play in this story.



(Focus. Look closer. She needs to focus now.)



Narrator:

(They’re coming. Coward! Get out!)



Only the dead dwell in Helheim – and that is where you must travel.



The darkness is coming. It yearns for life, hungers for it – like a pack of wolves on a hunt. But she’s not stopping.



Not this time.



(Can you see it? Helheim. He’s there. I feel him.)



The land of mist and fog. The old fool was right. What was it he said? The river of knives across which lies the halls of Hel. The place they call Helheim.



(He’s lost. You can’t save him.)



Senua:

Where are you?



I hear you.



Dillion:

Senua.



Narrator:

(He’s there. He’s lost.)



There’s no doubt about it. The source of the darkness is in Helheim. And the goddess Hela holds his soul there.



(You’ll never find him.)



Senua:

I’m coming...



Narrator:

Her dear beloved, Dillion.



(Why is she doing this? Why doesn’t she turn back? She’s doing this for him. She wants to rescue him. He’s already dead.)



(But his soul is still Helheim. His soul still lives. She needs to lay him to rest. She’ll never save him. She can’t let him rot here. She’ll needs to try.)



The bridge to Helheim...I forget its name. She forgets too. But she does remember that only the dead may cross it. That part wasn’t so easy to forget. The old fool said there was a hidden path up to it. Let’s see, shall we?



(Up there. Climb. What’s up there?)



(Why did she do that? She can’t go back now.)



Senua:

No, this is it. The hidden path.



(It’s dangerous! Touch it! It’s going to hurt you.)



Druth:

Don’t kill me. I’m not one of them! I was just hiding. I find I live longer that way. I’ll never let the bastards catch me again! NEVER! Wait...who are you?



(The darkness is coming! It’s just a memory! Listen! He lies!)



Senua:

Druth? Is that you?



Druth:

For my tales of the northmen, they call me Druth, a liar, an old fool! Druth is my Truth.



Senua:

It’s good to see you again. You kept your vow...



Druth:

...to guide you in this life and the next... I will tell you my stories of Hel, if I may walk with you?



Senua:

Tell me your stories again old friend. I’m still listening.



Druth:

The runes seal the gates to Hel.



Focus your inner eye and you too will see what’s hidden in the plain sight.



Senua:

I can see one.



Druth:

Hold it in your mind’s eye. Find one like it to open the gate.



Look towards the gate ...and the gate will open...



(The gate is open. Go through the gate. Go through it. It’s dangerous. What’s behind the gate?)



Senua:

It worked.



(It’s not safe.)



Druth:

I spent six years enslaved in Hel...but I watched the northmen, learnt their ways!



Senua:

I know you did.



Druth:

You listened, when everyone else laughed. My people paid heavy price. Carry my stories with you and together, we will make the northmen feel our fury!



Narrator:

Another voice joins us. She once tried to make them go away...prtend they weren’t real but what good is that, when we are always?



I guess it’s the same with heights. You can stand on the edge, pretend it’s going to be ok. But you know that death is near, wating for you to make that little slip. You can’t just wish things away.



Narrator:

The gate to Helheim divides the living from the dead. Is that the face of Hela, herself? The half-rotten goddess that rules over Helheim? Whatever horrors lie behind that door, she must find him.



(Push it! You can do it! Come on!)



Shhh! Someone’s here.



Senua:

The darkness!



You. You took him from me. I beg you. Let him go. I’ll give you what you want. I won’t resist anymore. Just give him back.



(Idiot! You’re going to die!)



Narrator:

A vision, of what’s to come? Poor Senua. The darkness does not bargain. It does not reason. It is rot. And now it has taken hold, it will spread towards her head, the seat of the soul, until there is nothing left of her.



(It’s hurting her. Rotting. Every time she fails, the dark rot grows.)



All of her suffering will have been for nothing. It’s just a matter of time.



(THE DARK ROT WILL GROW EACH TIME YOU FAIL)



(IF THE ROT REACHES SENUA’S HEAD, HER QUEST IS OVER)



(AND ALL PROGRESS WILL BE LOST)



The hardest battles are fought in the mind. That is what Dillion taught her. With every defeat, the dark rot will grow and soon it will take her soul. But, for now at least, she still has control of her mind. And she will fulfill her vow, whatever the cost.



Druth:

Listen to me Senua, Helheim lies behind this gate. To open it you must face the gods that guard it. The god of fire, Surt, and the god of illusion, Varlravn.



Spill their blood to open the gate and enter the land of the dead.



(The gate to Helheim. The gate to Dillion. To Hela. Why won’t it open? She has to challenge two gods first. Which one will she first?)



Valravn, ancestor of the seers, and master of ravens. He hunts his prey with his powers of illusion and feasts on their remains.



Follow the path to Valravn and defeat him in battle to earn his mark. The gate to Helheim cannot be opened without it.



(Focus!)



Illusion hides the path to Valravn. Don’t trust your eyes. Find another way to see the truth.



(What’s that? It’s bridge, idiot. Push it!)



(She did it!)



(Look. Something’s different. Can you see it? Why can’t she see it?)



Narrator:

It’s funny. We all want to see behind the veil, don’t we? But once we do...we mostly just close our eyes again and pretend what we saw was never really there.



Senua never could close her eyes, however hard she tried...and begged.



This is the price she pays for seeing things differently. Because once you gaze into the relentless darkness, all that lurks within it... can see you too.



The northmen will not stop her. She will find what she’s looking for.



Druth:

Valravn’s power of illusion comes from ravens. Align the ravens to break his magic seal.



(Look around you. It’s all different now.)



(Something’s shifted. Can you feel it?)



Narrator:

Do you feel it too? It’s like crossing into another world that looks the same but feels different...an imposter world... where the forest itself is watching.



(Another gate! You know what to do!)



Druth:

To break the seal, align the ravens with the mark of Valravn...



(Shh. Can you hear it? Valravn’s song! You have to focus! Focus!)



Senua:

I hear something.



Druth:

If you hear the song of Valravn, follow it and it will lead you to him. But be aware of his illusions. You can’t always trust your eyes.



(The song. Valravn’s song. Focus! Focus!)



Senua:

Valravn! Challenge me!



(He’s gone! Where did he go? You lost him. It’s all your fault!)



(You lost him again. You’re stupid!)



Narrator:

Is she lost? It wouldn’t be the first time. Last winter, before the tragedy, she journeyed into the wilds of her native land, living off berries, roots and rabbits.



(You lost him again. You’re stupid!)



It’s not uncommon you see. We call such a person a Geilt. Some, like Druth, become Geilt in search of penance. Others, like Senua, to purge a curse. Those who make it back, are forever changed.



(You lost him again. You’re stupid!)



(She can get up now? It must be magic! A trick. Valravn’s magic.)



We picture fear and we think of a shadow in the woods, a creature in the night. If only it were that simple.



The worst kind comes without warning, a deep and primal signal from within. A reminder that just because you cannot see the threat, it doesn’t mean that it’s not already here.



(She can’t go in there. Druth says there’s always another route.)



(Watch out! Behind you!)



Narrator:

Do you know what it’s like to leave everything behind, your home, loved ones, to head deep into the wilds, perhaps never to return?



Senua does. Because when darkness speaks, it changes everything, turning home into a foreign land and loved ones into strangers. Exile makes sense when you realise that you were never really home in the first place.



(She has to align the ravens! There’s too many of them! Too many!)



(There are too many of them!)



(The song. Valravn. Valravn’s song. It’s here. No it’s there! There’s two of them! Focus!)



(This reminds her of somewhere. The forest. Which forget? The forest in the wilds. A long time ago)



(She went to the wilds a long time ago. Why did she go to the wilds? She wanted to fight her own darkness. She thought she could beat her own darkness. Did she beat her darkness? No. It nearly killed her but she tried. Druth. Druth helped her. If it wasn’t for Druth she’d be dead. She can’t beat her own darkness.)



(She wanted to marry Dillion. She came to beat her own darkness. She thought her curse would infect him.)



(Open it! She can’t! Not from this side. The other side.)



(The ravens have gone! No, half have gone. It’s a trap. No. Valravn is helping.)



Senua:

Quiet! I need to think.



Narrator:

Out in the wilds, in the cold winter woods, she no longer felt fit for this world. She almost gave in to the darkness. Almost.



But she remembered Dillion’s words. She remembered her promised. She resolved to fight on and kill that which had become a part of her.



(The ravens have gone! No, half have gone. It’s a trap. No. Valravn is helping.)



Looking back, it was so naïve to think she could banish it on her own. The further she saw into the darkness, the more she struggled to see anything at all.



And in the gloom, the smallest hints of shape, sound, or thought, grew in strength until they consumed her whole. Before she knew it, the darkness had her in its claws.



(She did. The seal is broken! The gate is open!)



There is no such thing as victory when it comes to the darkness. It’s like it doesn’t want to kill her...yet. It will gnaw at her, biding it’s time. Only when she is at her weakest will it strike to kill. Will she find Dillion before her time comes?



Druth:

Overcome Valravn’s final illusion, to face him in his keep. I know you can so it, Senua. You have the sight.



Senua:

We both see the darkness, Druth. With your help, I might beat it.



Speak to me Druth? Tell me a story.



Druth:

Senua, listen, and I will tell you the tale of a man called Findan.



The Northmen captured Findan’s sister, and his father sent him to pay for her release.



But they took his gold, put him in chains and held him for a day and night without food or water.



Then they released him. I don’t know why.



Upon his return, his father’s enemies in Erin set fire to his home.



His father burnt to death and his brother was killed, but he escaped, with sorrow in his heart.



His father’s enemies offered redress for his loss and invited him to a feast, it was at a hall near the sea. But when he went there, they betrayed him to the Northmen who enslaved him and took him to Hel.



Six years later, his slave-masters landed on the shores of Orkney, burning all before them. And into that fire Findan made his escape.



What was Findan, burnt away that day from the flames, a new man stepped forward and Druth, was born. Druth, the man that I am now.



And though Findan never set eyes on his dear sister again, I, Druth, have found you, Senua...



Senua:

I wish you could have seen my home before these dark times.



(She did. The seal is broken! The gate is open!)



Wait! This darkness. I know it from the wilds. It’s coming back for me!



Narrator:

I’m still here. Are you too?



Where are we?



Oh. I remember.



Senua:

Where am I?



Narrator:

It didn’t end well in the wilds. It never does. You think you can overcome the darkness - make sense of it...and once relief settles in...it strikes out of nowhere, throwing you helplessly back into the maelstrom.



Drowning the mind in fear...deeper...deeper...dragging you down so far into the void that maybe this time, there is no coming back.



Senua:

What’s happening?



Help me. Help!



Narrator:

But there in the darkness and she remembered what he told her.



Druth:

Senua! Senua! Hear me!



Reach out to me!



Senua:

Druth help me!



Druth:

Senua. Take my iron mirror. Look into it, for it is a window into the underworld.



Within, you will see the face of the darkness that you fear.



And if you focus, like I have taught you to, you will also see that as much the darkness has you trapped within it’s veil, it too is trapped within yours.



Focus! Focus! Focus!



Senua:

I see you! You led me to the wilds! You trapped me there! But I can see you now!



I never beat you in the wilds, did I? It was an illusion! But not this time!



Druth:

The mark of Valravn. One of the keys to the gate to Helheim. Hold it in your mind’s eye.



Narrator:

With every battle the darkness grows stronger. Every victory bringing her closer to defeat. Unfair isn’t it?



In those dark winter nights in the wilds, there were times when she considered (breaking the pattern)...letting go...



If it weren’t for Druth, a chance encounter in the wilds, she would not have heard his stories of the northmen.



And she would not have this chance to find Dillion’s soul.



Senua:

I’m coming.



I still hear you



Narrator:

I wonder, can you see the faces too? They’re there if you look for them.



Senua:

Mother!



Galena:

Senua. You have the sight. Just like I do. Once you can see into the underworld, the underworld and all the souls within it will see you.



Don’t be afraid when they speak to you. I will always be here to guide you.



Narrator:

Did you see her? That was her mother, Galena.



She was a priestess. A healer.



She taught Senua to see the weave that binds the world together and it was beautiful.



It was a time before the darkness. But when it did come, it first came for her mother.



Senua still sees her face from time to time, hidden in the world. Like she is still watching over her. She misses her so much.



(Hela’s gate won’t open. Why? She hasn’t challenged Surt.)



Druth:

Surt, the fire giant has answered. He comes from a land older than mankind. And the northmen call upon his flaming sword to raze their enemies to the ground. Find him Senua, and spill his blood.



Narrator:

She found the wretched old fool on her way back from the wilds. An outcast. He was badly burnt all over. She took pity on him for he was not long for this world.



Galena:

Senua, we each walk these lands gazing towards different horizons, some of us further than others.



Your father cannot see what you see, but there is nothing wrong with seeing the world the way you do.



Druth:

I can still smell it. The sweet sickly stench of burning human flesh. And I still hear their cries carried in the wind. Do you hear them too, Senua?



Senua:

Yes, I heard the screams. And I still hear it now.



Druth:

The path to Helheim is sealed to the living. But you already walk amongst the dead... look towards the gate, and you will see that it has opened.



When they first came to my lands, I knew enough of their tongue to beg for mercy and they took me as slave...I wish now that they had slaughtered me like the others.



I rode their storm of fire, death, and slavery to many lands. This darkness you speak of...I know it well.



Senua:

And I will still fight it!



Druth:

When you see a fire-gate of Surt, know that only a sacrifice will stoke the fires of Muspell and let the dead walk through.



(The sacrifice! There it is! Focus!)



Hel will not give you the answers you want. But you mustn’t look away from the horror it does offer, because you cannot overcome suffering if you refuse to look at it.



(Where’s the fire gone? It was a trick! It was an illusion. Surt is testing her.)



(The pyre. Surt is waiting for her. She can’t get through. Find your own path.)



(Another gate. Another sacrifice. She needs to find it.)



(She will never make her way back. Everything will burn. How will she find her way back?)



Druth:

Find the fire, Senua, to follow the path to Surt.



The northmen made fire sacrifices, burning slaves like me, to reveal the path to Surt. I searched for the meaning in their suffering, in their eyes, but they just screamed like helpless pigs!



Do your gods answer your prayers Senua? I asked the gods for mercy, all of them, even theirs, but none answered! In the end I set myself free. I say Defy the gods! Find your own path like I found mine!



Senua:

My gods abandoned me. I am alone.



Druth:

The Northmen of Hel worship the devourers, insatiable gods of darkness.



I come from Éirinn, Senua, where I once followed my own gods, the Tuatha Dé Danann.



Senua:

How did you lose your gods?



Druth:

Senua...I was a man of knowledge, not a warrior. To survive...I did things, bad things.



Like you Senua, the man I once was has died. And when that happens, even gods you worship can die with you.



Druth:

You say your world has collapsed. Good. Let it collapse and have the courage to shed your tears. Raze your world to the ground!



Senua:

My world has died!



Druth:

Only then, as a newborn, you will see the world anew.



Senua:

No...I see nothing now.



How did you escape your darkness, Druth?



Druth:

Once I found my purpose...I was no longer enslaved to suffering I had to endure to reach it.



Unclouded by fear, I could see it clearly in others...even my captors feared the fire of Surt!



And so during one raid, I took my chance and ran, knowing that they would not follow!



The fool ran into fire! Hahahaha...they left me for dead...maybe they were right to...but here I am: free!



Senua, if I can survive the fire of Surt, and escape my darkness then so can you!



Run Senua! Run and run! Through the fire! Keep running! Go on! Nothing will stop you!



Senua:

I’m sorry. I’m so sorry. The darkness destroys everything. Everyone.



Dillion:

Are you sure you want to do this by yourself? We can fight it together. Side by side, as always.



Senua:

This is my battle. I have to face it alone. Away from here.



Dillion:

Where will you go?



Senua:

I don’t know.



Dillion:

For how long?



Senua:

I don’t know.



Dillion:

I believe in you. You know that. Just promise...you will come back to me. I want you to say it. I want you to say it.

 

Senua:

I will come back to you. I promise.

Druth:

Spill the blood of Surt and take his Mark and I will cheer you from the underworld and forever be in your debt.



Senua:

You destroyed everything! Everyone! Except me! Fight me now!



Druth:

For every battle won, a greater battle takes its place and so it goes until we fall.



And in the end we all fall. Even the gods have their time. Yet we still go on. Why?



Senua:

I made a promise. I will go to Hel to keep it.



Druth:

I die free, knowing you will carry my stories with you. I have fulfilled my quest.



Senua:

Yes you have.



Druth:

...when the darkness comes I vow to guide you in this life and the next to fulfill yours.



Senua:

Then I will see you in Hel.



Druth:

Be ready to face horror in the eye, as I have, to find your answers, your quest, your truth...



Narrator:

Druth was a troubled man. A scholar turned slave. They tortured him, took him with them on their raids, drove him to madness. Spreading this new form of darkness to new worlds. To my world.



Senua saw a deep connection form between the northmen and the darkness. If his tales of Hel were true, then that was the source of it. She learnt everything she could from him. Until she too could see what he saw.



Have you ever died before? It’s a serious question. When the illusion of self is shattered, you simply cease to be.



Though it may not seem that way to others, you know when it is true. You can feel it, a stranger in your own body, an imposter...and nothing is the same ever again. Senua has died three times before. And she will do so again. You can be sure of that.



(She did it! She can open the gate to Helheim. To Hela. To Dillion.)



With the mark of Valravn and the Mark of Surt, you may cross the bridge over the river of knives to Helheim.



(It’s dark. The darkness! Only the dead may cross...)



Senua:

Druth? Anyone?



Zynbel:

There is no one here but me.



Senua:

Not you.



Zynbel:

Did you think that I would let you go? That you lost me back in the wilds?



I will never let you go. You can’t get rid of me. I am your shadow.



And I will be watching when draw your last dying gasp.



Senua:

I’m not ready to die.



Zynbel:

You will be when you see what they did to your dear beloved.



Senua:

DILLION! Dillion...



Zynbel:

In this waking nightmare...Where all dreams come true. You searched for control, a way to pull through.



When you were in love you left him in tears, to smother your furies and banish your fears. But in darkness they came, through stormy black seas they raided these shores.



Do you still hear his screams? Now that your home... he’s so far away, they’ve taken his soul. To these Gods you cannot pray.



They can break you not your promise, even his death won’t keep you apart. Through this darkness you will find him in your sword still beats a heart.



You fought for love and spoilt by your darkness within, you fought for your dream...now there is no way to win...



In the head of his corpse lies the seat to his soul. So you must carry his vessel to bring him back home.



Senua:

No, no.



Zynbel:

They can break you not your promise, even his death won’t keep you apart. Through this darkness you will find him in your sword still beats a heart.



The darkness touched you. Everyone could see it in the hollows of your eyes, a gaze averted from life. You ran from it but brought it nearer. Led it to him. An endless suffering worse than death.



And you wanted to surrender? Abandon him to find peace with the gods? No. The darkness won’t allow it. So you will walk into the liar of beast, look it in the eye and you will go to war.



This is your mission. This is your quest. There is nothing else left.



The gods made you a warrior for a reason! It’s your calling.



Why suffer the past, when there is a new road ahead. The only one that makes any sense.



Zynbel:

Every gate you open into darkness brings another chance to fight it!



Druth:

The journey to Helheim is never a straight one. Each must find their own path. Align yourself to its secrets and you will find yours.



Narrator:

The gate. It’s opening. Why?



(It’s coming.)



That song again. It’s Hela...



Zynbel:

Yes. The source of the darkness. It’s coming. This is your moment.



Narrator:

I’m sorry. I can’t watch this.



Zynbel:

What are you doing? You’re showing weakness! Get up. You’re not a warrior, you’re a disgrace! The gods will punish you for this! Pick up your sword! Pick it up! Fight the darkness! Fight it!



Get up! Get up!



Get up and fight!



Narrator:

Once again, Hel is reaching deep inside of her. Stormy seas and lost souls. She’s dreamt of this before...They say dreams are visions of our memories, thoughts and fears as seen by our inner eye. Is this what Hel is? A world shaped by Senua’s nightmares?



But what if each one of us is always dreaming even when awake? And we only see what our inner eyes creates for us? Maybe that’s why people feared seeing the world through her eyes. Because if you believe that Senua’s reality is twisted, you must accept that yours might be too.



Zynbel:

You’ve failed the gods...You’re pathetic...rotten...cursed!



What were you thinking? Did you really think you could win? How stupid can you be.



Everyone hates her! She’s cursed!



Look at you. A warrior? Worthless. Weak. Pathetic. Go on, feel sorry for yourself, because there is no one left to do that for you.



Take it! If you’re too much of a coward to fight then end the suffering!



Broken and lost, just like your sword.



(Do it. Go! Do it! Come on. Dead)



Senua:

(Screaming...)



Narrator:

Why go on? When you give everything and face that which torments you, only to find that it is worse than you could have imagined...Why go on?



Is it really so weak to ask this? Or are we just so afraid of the honest answer, that we do not dare pose the question? Sometimes the answer lies in a memory...a feeling...a song.



(She’s alive. What’s that sound? It’s song.)



(Dillion. It’s not real. Listen to it.)



Dillion:

Senua! Look at me. Don’t give up. Not like this.



(It is not real. It’s a trick don’t trust it. It’s real. Maybe you’re already dead.)



Senua:

Who are you?



Dillion:

Do you still believe in me, Senua? In us?



(He comes here it’s impossible.)



Senua:

Dillion...



Dillion:

Come to me...please.



(The light. Go towards the light. It’s him. There he is. It’s a trick in your mind. No, it’s him. It’s real. It’s happening.)



(It’s not him! Go towards him!)



(He’s gone, you’re too slow! We told you! It was a trick.)



Narrator:

Before she first met him, she was not in a good place. Just a teenager but not like the others. Barely functioning, she rarely left the house. Her father, Zynbel, made sure of that.



(You can do it! Your body is falling apart. Keep going.)



Only occasionally did she venture out on her own, collecting fire wood and herbs, errands out in the Orkney plains.



That was her world. Like this one, barren and lonely.



(Nothing lives here, not even you. It’s pointless.)



(There he is! Under the tree!)



There he was. The lone figure of a boy, swordplay under the shade of a tree. She remembers the first time she saw him. To her young eyes, he moved as if dancing, and the world danced with him. The gloom lifted, and for the first time in years, she felt...a ray of hope.



Day after day, watching from afar, she mimicked him. Perfecting her own secret dance. Wishing those fleeting moments of light would stretch out to last forever.



(You want to believe it’s real but it’s a trick! You can’t even fight!)



How does he so effortlessly court the world in bliss? If only she could the same...see the world through eyes anew...and dance with it just like he does.



Dillion:

What’s your name?



Senua:

Senua.



Dillion:

I haven’t seen you before.



Senua:

I’m not...I don’t leave home much.



Dillion:

Oh. Zynbel’s daughter...



Senua:

I have to go.



Dillion:

Wait. Who taught you to fight like that?



Senua:

No one.



Dillion:

No one?



Senua:

Well I watched...and...



Dillion:

You learnt all of that by watching me?



Senua:

...



Dillion:

You should become a warrior, you know.



I’m Dillion. I’m here for the warrior trials. You should come and watch...and bring your sword.



Narrator:

You can’t put it into words. That moment when you look into the eyes of the one who is supposed to reassure you, make you feel safe...



It only takes an instant. Fear swallows you before you have a chance to make sense of it. And darkness becomes a part of who you are.



But her world changed the day the northmen took him from her. Senua knows that there is no going back to how things were. That there is nothing to go back to at all.



Zynbel:

The gods can see you into your mind. They will use this power to destroy you.



Senua:

They won’t stop me. I can still feel him.



Zynbel:

Whatever’s left of him, they will never let him go.



Senua:

I’m not going to let him rot here!



Zynbel:

You’re the one rotting here!



Senua:

Leave me alone.



Zynbel:

You will die here and all your suffering will be for nothing!



Senua:

Shut up!!!



Dillion:

Senua.



Senua:

Dillion? Is that you? I’ll find you my love. I promise.



(You won’t survive! She met him by the tree. Maybe it’s sign!)



(Take it! The sword! Don’t take it!)



(It’s coming from there! And there! What are they!)



What’s happening?



Druth:

(Druth! He’s here He’s not really here.)



Senua, imagine, a sword that can slay gods! It’s name is Gramr. It was forged by the god of all Northmen, Odin and gifted to Sigmund, a great warrior.



Senua:

I need this sword. It’s important. Can you help me?



Druth:

The sword appears whole, but it is an illusion. It shattered into shards long ago.



It is said, a great warrior can reforge Gramr by answering the trails of Odin, one for each shard. The roots of the tree of death will take you to new lands where you will face the trials.



(Go to the shards! The metal.)



(There’s the shard. Go to it. Focus.)



I saw once a plague strike northern lands of ice. It was so terrible that not the oldest man among us could remember the like. Hundreds died.



The sickness took nearly every person younger than forty and many older, and where dying mothers gave birth, the marks of the plague were on the babes as they came out of the womb.



(Where are we? I don’t like it. This place feels creepy. This place stinks.)



Senua:

What is this place?



(There he is . Dillion. The light. He’s in the house.)



(He’s going in. Keep him in your sight.)



(Where’s it gone?)



It’s a test. Like the old warrior trials. Dillion will help me.



(It’s just a trial. You have to solve and then you will find him. He’s so close.)



Narrator:

The stench of rot. She can almost taste it. Do you smell it? No? Don’t worry, not everyone can. It was a warm spring day when she went to the river with Dillion and the others.



(The arch. Is it a gate? It’s magic.)



But the water...she could taste the rot. Bot no one else could. She knew something was wrong. Sometimes sinister. She begged them to leave but they just laughed at her. But soon enough, as the bodies piled up no one was laughing, and they knew that she was not like them.



(The bridge. It’s broken. Fix it.)



(The house. You can see the light. Find him.)



(She did it! She didn’t do it! It’s not done yet.)



(You found a way to climb the tower.)



Dillion:

Senua?



Come to me!



Where are you?



Senua:

I’m here. I’m right here!



Dillion:

Are you in there?



(The runes. You have to focus. End the trials. Find him.)



Come out if you are!



(What’s that sound! Where are we? Someone’s calling!)



Senua:

Dillion! They’re coming for me!



(It’s too much! You’re dying!)



(Who are they? It’s Dillion! It’s not Dillion!)



(There it is! Get away! You’ll burn!)



(It’s close! It’s close! Move away! Don’t let them see you!)



(There! Focus! Find it! Focus!)



(Run! Run! Find it! Run now! You don’t even have your sword!)



(Senua! It’s not safe here!)



(It’s not safe. I feel not safe. You’re dying!)



What should I do? Where are you!



(The light! Another one! Go towards it! Focus!)



(Two more to find! Where are they? Where’s Dillion? Where are you?)



(One more! Don’t get lost! Don’t let it look at you!)



Where are you?



(You have to find a way out! Get out!)



Dillion:

Senua!



Senua. What happened?



Senua:

They blame me for the plague. Say that I am cursed and brought the darkness to this clan. What if they are right?



Dillion:

How could they know such a thing? Are they gods? None of us are. They are just people, good people, but they are scared.



They are afraid of what they can’t see. Like children scared of the dark. So they make up stories to fill the void. That doesn’t make them true.



Senua:

What if my father was right?

 

Dillion:

You have to step out of this darkness. Let them see you you really are, like I have. You are not a monster.



Senua:

Without you, this darkness has made me a moster.



(You did it. But there’s more. There’s always more to do. Can you do another one?)



(It’s not going to be easy.)



Druth:

I want to tell you a story about a god of the Northmen called Baldr.



The second son of Odin, he was beautiful, good and wise.



He was fair of feature, he spoke fair words, he gave fair judgements.



Light shone from him; only good things were told of him. Yet he was the first of the gods to dies...



(You’ve come this far but the bridge is broken. There’s no way you can fix it. What do you do now Senua?)



(The face. A mask? What is it? What does it see?)



(Be careful. It’s not safe. Trust us.)



(Where are we? It’s the same but different. It’s lighter. It’s nicer!)



(The bridge is not broken. In this world, It is fixed!)



(Let’s cross it.)



(Dillion is in there. You need to find the runes to find Dillion.)



(It’s closed. Open the gate! She can’t. It’s locked. Try harder.)



(The gate is open. Go through the gate. Go through it. It’s dangerous. Follow it. What’s behind the gate?)



(Dillion. There he is. What are you waiting for? Quick, find the way! Don’t let him disappear!)



(Where is he? We’re in the wrong world. He’s in the other world. He’s in the dark world.)



Narrator:

The world once seemed so simple: black and white, darkness and light. Narrow dividing lines of our own making.



Dillion taught her to see further, to peek through the cracks and see the worlds of colour stretching away from the gloom. And Senua explored new paths into the unknown.



(You can’t go up there. Not in this world.)



(Senua, you’ve got it! Why isn’t he here? He’s in the dark world. Without you.)



(He’s up there. How do you get up there? Find the way.)



Senua:

Where are you taking me?



Narrator:

Years had passed since she left her father. She trained hard, alongside her friend, Dillion. She saw things no one else could, patterns, shapes, movement. An intuition that made her an exceptional warrior.



Friendship turned to love. But the shadow of darkness never let her go and she was caught between two worlds. That of Zynbel and her past, and Dillion, her future. Two realities tearing at her soul.



(She is pure darkness.)



(Waste of your time. These runes mean nothing. What if these trials mean nothing? The gods are laughing at you.)



(What if this is pointless? You see runes everywhere! What if the gods were lying? They don’t mean anything!)



Senua:

Dillion!



(Be careful. Very careful. You’ve come this far. Don’t let him slip away. You can do it!)



Narrator:

Dillion never much cared for the underworld and looked dimly upon druids like her father Zynbel.



I guess he took after his own father, a chieftain who believed nothing he couldn’t see, and he happened to be blind.



(You’re going to fall. It’s not safe.)



She felt safe in Dillion’s arms, learnt to see through his eyes and the darkness that had bound her so tightly...began to unravel.



Senua:

No!!!



(Where is he? It’s your fault. He’s gone. Drown.)



Dillion:

Senua, your father cannot understand your darkness. He cannot see through your eyes. No one can. My own father was born blind and doesn’t have the faintest idea of what the night looks like. The word means as little to him as the word “light”.



So if someone is afraid of the dark, should we fix them by taking waay their sight?



Would you give up the beautiful world that you and only you can see just to be rid of your nightmares?



Maybe this is the price paid for the gift that the gods have granted you. A gift that makes you so special in my eyes. Just another part of the person I love.



(What if this is pointless?)



Senua:

I left for the wilds to protect you from my darkness. Because I love you. But it made it worse. I’m so sorry.



Druth:

The Northmen say that their Allfather, Odin, gave his eye in exchange for a drink from Mimir’s well, the well of wisdom.



In blindness there can be wisdom; only by giving, can you receive in return.



For this reason, I give my life, and pass on my stories of the Northmen to you, Senua...



Senua:

Where am I? I can’t see.



Dillion:

Shhhh.



Senua:

Who’s there?



Dillion:

Can you hear me?



Senua:

Dillion?



Dillion:

I’m right here. Can’t you see me?



Senua:

No. Help me. It’s the darkness.



Dillion:

Breathe slow... stay still... Empty your thoughts.



Tell me what you feel.



Senua:

A breeze.



Dillion:

Good. Then there is a way out.



Senua:

I can’t tell where it comes from.



Dillion:

Yes you can.



Senua:

The others...the voices...they’ve gone.



Dillion:

I’m still here.



Senua:

It’s so quiet. So dark.



Dillion:

It’s ok. Listen to your own breath. Feel it rise and fall.



Good. Be aware of everything you hear and feel. Let your senses guide you.



Senua:

I can’t go on...Dillion?



Dillion:

Find a way. I’m not leaving you here.



Senua:

I think I’m somewhere else now. The breeze has gone.



Dillion:

Use all of your senses. Let the world speak to you. What do you hear?



Senua:

I hear water.



Dillion:

Go to it.



Senua:

I’ve reached the water.



Dillion:

Good. That’s your way out. Follow it upstream.



Senua:

I’m so sorry. I thought I left this all behind.



Dillion:

Don’t be sorry. It’s not your fault.



Senua:

He was right. It’s inside of me. It won’t let me go.



Dillion:

Senua. My father. He’s a great warrior and a wise man. He taught me that the hardest battles are fought in the mind, not the sword.



You’re no coward. You proved that to me in the warrior trials. This is just another battle. You can beat it.



Senua:

This isn’t your battle. You don’t have to help me.



Dillion:

I want to. Besides, you are going to be a great warrior one day. We need people like you.



Senua:

Ok. Ill do my best.



Narrator:

Shhhh. I know what you’re thinking. He’s not really here. It seems there is no escaping the past in this place. And so she is forced to relive it. To what end?



Senua:

There’s a waterfall. I can’t go on this way.



Dillion:

Then look for another way and tell me what you find.



Senua:

I don’t know what’s inside.



Dillion:

Don’t be afraid.



Senua:

Dillion. There’s something in here.



Dillion:

Do you see it?



Senua:

No.



Dillion:

Then it cannot see you. Quietly move past it. One step at a time.



Senua:

It’s not following me.



Dillion:

Leave it behind and keep moving forwards.



Senua:

I think I’m in a house. It stinks. Of death.



Dillion:

The darkness is testing you. But you are in control.



Senua:

It’s a dead end. A well. There’s a well.



Dillion:

Don’t turn back. You’re getting close.



Senua:

Dillion, help me… please.



Dillion:

Come to me, Senua.



Senua:

Dillion is that you? I can see a light.



Dillion:

Yes! I can see you too.



Narrator:

She could spend hours, days even, trapped within herself, in the dark.



Dillion:

You see me?



Senua:

Yes...



Dillion:

Your eyes were open but you were... gone.



Narrator:

And when it finally let her go, she could be anywhere, with no memory of how she got there.



Senua:

When it comes for me... I have no power over it. But I heard your voice. You brought me back.



Narrator:

But here for the first time, someone was there to help.



Dillion:

You found your own way back. All you needed was a little help. A little hope.



Druth:

A king in the north forced the dwarves to make a sword that would never fail and never rust and that would slice through iron and stone, and bring victory to its bearer.



But the angry dwarves cursed it: it would be the death of a man every time it was drawn, and it would be the death of king.



Let me tell you about the sword Tyrfing.



(Where is she? It feels wrong.)



Narrator:

Where are we now? ...a burial mound. So strange that we go to such lengths to bury death, something so very ordinary, inevitable. It’s as if we conspire to hide death, because we have no answer for it.



(Why has Dillion brought her here? The dead walk here.)



But when it comes, it forces itself on our friends or loved ones. Then it comes to recognize.



(Don’t go in there. Go in! Take the torch! It’s too dark. Take it.)



(This will help you. Careful!)



Senua:

Who’s there?



Dillion I’m here. I’m here for the trials. Like when we first met, remember?



Dillion:

Father! Come back to me! Don’t leave me!



(There he is! Dillion! Finally! Why is he crying? Go to him!)



Senua:

What’s wrong? What happened? Can you hear me? Just wait there! I’ll find you.



(How did you let him go again? Find him! You have to find him!)



(Light the torch!)



(It’s not him. We told you it was trick!)



(The voice is changing. It doesn’t sound like Dillion anymore.)



Quiet. He wants me to find him. I’m lost without him...



(What’s in there? A secret room. How does she get in there? Give up.)



That voice...it’s not Dillion!



Dillion wants me to face my fears.



Father? I’m leaving. I’ve decided. I think it will be good for me.



Zynbel:

It’s the darkness speaking through you.



Senua:

No dad. It’s me. I think I can beat it. In my own way.



Zynbel:

I can see the darkness in your eyes child...



Senua:

I met a boy...



Zynbel:

Boy?



Senua:

...the chieftains son...



Zynbel:

No.



Senua:

...he said he can help me...



Zynbel:

It’s a trick!



Senua:

...he says I can be normal...

 

Zynbel:

Normal?



Senua:

Yes!



Zynbel:

No boy is going to save you. When he sees the rot growing inside you, he will turn his back on you! The gods can only fix you through my hand. You’re not going anywhere.



You cannot defy the gods!



Come child. Take my hand. Come. Senua.



Senua:

No! I am leaving.



Zynbel:

You cannot escape the darkness. Your curse will make everyone suffer. You will have blood on your hands!



(You did it! Get the sword! You have to get the sword. Dillion left it for you! In the tree!)



Druth:

With Gramr reforged, you will have Odin’s blessing to walk, a goddess, into the halls of Helheim and challenge Hela as an equal.



Narrator:

Dillion gave her the strength to pass the warrior trials. And she saw a way out.



To leave her past behind and become a warrior in Dillion’s clan.



Senua:

So Dillion is helping me.



And the sword will lead me to him.

 

Like when we first met.

 

Zynbel:

The sword is tainted by gods of darkness. Leave it.



Senua:

No. He left it here. He wants me to take it.



Zynbel:

You will pay a price for this!



Narrator:

But years later, with Zynbel’s parting words still haunting her, the darkness came back with a vengeance. A plague. Everyone suffered.



Senua:

Dillion?



Dillion:

My father was not supposed to die like this.



Senua:

Dillion...



Zynbel:

Do you see it clearly now, Senua? The suffering you’ve caused?



(This is your fault. You brought this plague to us!)



(You have blood on your hands!)



(They’re coming for you now.)



(There’s no where to run to. Stay here and rot. This is where you belong.)



Druth:

In the Sea of Corpses, the corpsewave threw itself over the ones I loved, the ship broke up under them, the ship that had sailed from the land of shining fields.



Their memorial stone is secret.



Come not here in the sun, come not with a sword, come not crying over a naked corpse, come not with disturbed mind.



Zynbel:

Do you hear the suffering Senua? Does your precious gift of sight let you see the souls that rot here in this Sea of Corpses?



Do you feel the blood running cold on your skin? Do you hear their endless cries? Do you smell their putrid wounds?



They were once brothers, sisters and loved ones and look at what you have done to them!



All because you were a coward. Because you ran from your curse instead of facing it.



When you turned your back on your father Zynbel, you turned your back on the gods and let the darkness wreak havoc on your people!



Why must they pay for your heresy!



(Who’s that? It’s Galena. Her mother is here. She’s dead just like you.)



Senua:

Mother! Where are you?



Zynbel:

Do you hear Senua? Do you hear the voice of your mother Galena?



She calls for you Senua! Go to her! Answer her pitiful call!



Senua:

Mother! I need you! !Help me!



(The darkness took her and it will take you too.)



Galena:

Why are you doing this to me?



(You’re both dead! You both surrendered to darkness! Mother and daughter dead in the sea of corpses.)



Zynbel:

Even your dear beloved mother was powerless against the darkness when it came for her!



She too had the sight. She too doubted the gods and let the darkness infest her.



But she didn’t run. She escaped the only way she knew ho. She gave her life to the gods.



If only you had done the same, the world would have been spared this horror.



It’s not too late! She’s calling for you. Why don’t you join her.



Why do you still fight on? Maybe you too should suffer with your brethren in this rot and let your blood seep into the seas and rivers of Hel.



Isn’t that what you deserve after all you have done?



Give the darkness what it wants. Let it swallow your soul and destroy all that you are.



Why are you fighting for someone who is already dead?



Just look around you. What hope is there for him. Even if his soul could be rescued, do you think he would thank you for what you have done to him, to his friends, to his father?! Hahahaha.



(The darkness has taken you. Galena and Senua.)



(You are lost. There’s nothing you can do. You’re dead. You both are dead.)



Senua:

I can’t fight it anymore! Not on my own! Where are you, mother? I want to be with you...



Narrator:

That night, she gave up on her world... to follow in the footsteps of her mother. To go to a place where the darkness couldn’t reach her.



Dillion:

Senua, look at me.



Senua:

Do you hear them? They’re calling me...



Dillion:

We’ve lost so many. And I’ve lost my father. I can’t lose you.



Senua:

You said it. I have blood on my hands...



Dillion:

I didn’t say that. You’ve done nothing wrong!



Senua:

Zynbel was right. Everyone will suffer.



Dillion:

Zynbel is a fake! He is a hateful bitter liar! He is poison! And his words still haunt you.



Who do you trust? Him or me?



Do you still believe in me, Senua? In us...



Come back to me...please. Don’t let this darkness stand between us.



Narrator:

The hardest battles are fought in the mind.



He gave her the sword with which to fight in more ways than one. And she gave him her word never to surrender.



All she needed was a little help. A little hope.



(We found you. Where have you been? There she is...we thought we lost you. You need us. We’re here to help you. Don’t worry. You don’t have to do this alone anymore.)



(Silence is lonely.)



(There’s a way in. Look up! She’s so clever! Go up into the mountain. Just up there.)



(There’s a door. You can do it! You can see it. Come on Senua.)



Senua:

Go away. I’m not listening.



(Don’t open the door. What is it? She can feel it. No. Stay back!)



(Stay back! Stay back! Get back!)



What’s in there?



Zynbel:

A great beast guards Helheim. Garm is it’s name. And it knows you’re here, Senua. It can smell your stink!



(Stay in the light. She has to find Dillion! You have to go in!)



What are you afraid of, Senua? How will you save Dillion if you are too much of a coward to step in the shadows?



Senua:

They can’t stop me!



Zynbel:

Then do it!



(Go! Run! Keep going! She won’t make it!)



The beast is stalking you from the shadows! Your sword is useless here!



(Keep going! Run! The gods are in her mind!)



(Open the door! She can’t! Get the torch!)



Don’t be fooled. The beast is still here. Can you feel it?



Galena:

Senua.



(Who is it? It’s the beast! No, it’s Galena, her mother! It’s a trick!)



Zynbel:

No, it’s a trick.



Senua:

Mother?

 

Galena:

Do you hear them?



Zynbel:

Don’t fall for it.



Senua:

It’s me, Senua!



Galena:

It’s so loud!



Zynbel:

It’s not her!



Galena:

So full of hate!



I just want to help them.



Senua:

Tell me what to do?



Galena:

Your father wants them to go away. He only hurts me to silence them.



Senua:

But he’s gone now.



Galena:

But they always come back. He says I will die if I go with them. But they say that I am already dead.



Senua:

No please.



Galena:

And they want me with them.



Senua:

Stop!



Galena:

That’s why they crawl through the walls.



Senua:

Don’t listen to them.



Galena:

Do you see them? Do you see their faces?



(The darkness is stealing your memories. It’s not her! Yes it is!)



Senua:

Mother!



Galena:

He’s coming! Senua help me!



Senua:

How?



Galena:

Get me out of here.



Senua:

Don’t go!



Galena:

She shouldn’t be here. She escaped the darkness. She took her own life to escape it.



(It’s just another trick! She’s gone! The runes. Find them!)



Narrator:

She can’t remember when it started. When her mother lost her smile. He eyes gazing past her towards a world she could not see.



This is what happens if you reach for the underworld, he said. It was a lot to take in for a child and the first time she felt the cold chill of fear.



(Her torch is going out! The darkness will come again. She hasn’t got much time.)



I don’t talk much about her father, Zynbel. I suppose I just didn’t want to risk upsetting her. But it doesn’t matter now, does it?



(She has it! What’s the next? Two more to find! Why is she doing this? It’s pointless! A trick.)



(The beast has been here. Keep going.)



(She has to go under. She can’t. The torch will go out!)



(She can do it!)



(The light’s out! Run! Get to the light!)



(Get to the light!)



(Stop! Stop in the light! You’re safe in the light.)



(Get to the next light! Run!)



(Look! Fire! She has to get it!)



(There’s the torch! Take it! It will keep you safe!)



(Now you can see! She can find the rune!)



(There! The runes. Can you see them?)



(She has it! One more to find! What if there is nothing behind the door?)



This place. It reminds her of the isolating suffocating darkness she lived through as a young girl.



Imprisoned in her room at night, the faces in the dark, coming through the walls. She once thought everyone could see them.



I mean, that’s what children say all the time isn’t it? That there are monsters in the dark.



By the time she realised that only she could see them, her father, Zynbel, could see the monster in her.



(The light won’t save her now.)



(Fight! Use your sword!)



(She did it. You can’t go anywhere without the light. Take the torch and move.)



(She’s lighting the torch to keep the darkness away.)



(You have all the runes! She has to go back to the door! Save her mother!)



Zynbel:

Do you feel it? The beast is crawling into your mind, searching for weakness.



First it found your mother and used her to trap you in here.



Senua:

Did you see her die? I don’t remember. I was only five.



They told me she escaped the darkness, and that she is with the gods.



(Go through the door. You can save your mother. Where is she? It’s a trick!)



But what if they lied? What if the darkness took her and trapped her here?



Zynbel:

It’s a trap! The beast is coming! How stupid can you be?



(Hold on!)



Senua:

No! No! No!



Zynbel:

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE!



Senua:

No! No!



Zynbel:

You’ve lost him! It’s over!



(The darkness is back! Get out!)



Without his head you will never bring his soul back! His fate is sealed.



Senua:

Dillion!



Zynbel:

Do you remember that darkness, Senua?



The beast is bringing it back.



Senua:

Mother. Why did you leave me?



This darkness. It’s spreading.



Father’s keeping me away from the others. Away from Dillion.



I won’t give up. I’m not going to rot here. I’m going to find Dillion.



(She can’t go there. There’s no light! She has to! She’ll die when the torch goes out.)



(Zynbel was right. Zynbel was trying to save her from the darkness.)



(But she never listen.)



(What she do? She’s lighting the torch! She’ll be safe. What’s her plan?)



(Now she can go through. No she can’t. She can do it!)



(You have to keep running! Faster! Faster!)



(Force it! Force the bridge down!)



(She’s fallen! Get up!)



Narrator:

Dillion...she can’t help but think of him. A tender guiding flame in a world so black.



(There’s still further to go! He’s close. She can feel it. Keep the torch alight!)



The longer it burned, the more she convinced herself that there was nothing beyond it’s reach. How little separates us from what we fear.



(The beast is near! Keep looking for Dillion! Don’t let the torch go out!)



(The beast! It’s coming! The darkness is coming! Go quickly!)



Dillion:

Come back to me.



Come back!



Do you hear me?



Senua:

I hear you! I’m coming for you! I’m coming!



(The torch has gone out! The darkness is here! The head! Run!)



(There he is! Keep going! The light! She can see it!)



Dillion! I see you!



No! You’re not taking him from me!



(The beast has Dillion! Think, Senua! Find him!)



Zynbel:

I warned you Senua. I warned you not to come here.



I can smell your fear.



Senua:

No!



Zynbel:

You betrayed your gods.



(Dillion is yours. Protect him! If you lose him you lose everything!)



Senua:

I’m living with him!



Zynbel:

You turned your back on me.



That is why Dillion will rot in Hel!



(You has to fight! Fight for Dillion!)



Come into my shadow!



Narrator:

People think of evil as an unnatural invisible force, and so invoke the gods for protection. But evil can come from the hand behind the gods: a familiar hand, cold and cruel.



He tries to fix her with his...rituals. Kept her trapped in that hole.



She couldn’t say which was worse... the darkness or the monster that her father had become.



She couldn’t fight them both.



And so she left. Headed for the one ray of light that shone down on her.



If she had stayed, she wouldn’t have survived. But...maybe Dillion would still be alive...



Senua:

I’m so sorry my love.



Narrator:

She will save his soul, even if, this time, she can’t save her own.



Zynbel:

Forgive me Senua. I know you have no reason to trust me anymore.



(The shadow! Listen. Don’t trust it.)



But believe this. It was my mission to make you hate, to hate the darkness with a passion so great, that it would focus your mind on this quest.



For without it...I feared you would have let go of this life.



All this time I wanted to protect you from this beast that would have destroyed you long time ago.



But you have conquered your darkness at every turn.



You deserve to see behind the veil of darkness.



Senua:

Then take me into the mountain.



(He wants us to trust him.)



As deep as we can go.



Zynbel:

I won’t stand in your way.



You will not survive what is in there.



Senua:

I know.



Mother. I won’t let the darkness trick me again. I know you’re safe with the gods.



I can feel Hela’s gaze, searching for secrets inside of me. Secrets that even I can’t see.



I’m not here to fight my past. I’m here for Dillion.



I will fulfill my vow, whatever the cost.



(The bridge. It’s broken. She can’t fix it. She can. She’s done it before.)



(You have to fight on. Be powerful. The final battle. Get his soul back.)



(It’s the final test.)



Yes it is.



This isn’t just a broken bridge, is it?



Mother, you showed me how to see further, to see the hidden wonders in our world...and explore new paths into the unknown.



To lead so that others may follow, or to warn so that they may avoid. That’s our gift and our duty.



I’m not going to look away in fear anymore.



(She can do it. She can still see the secrets of the gods! She can do it.)



(Fight! Use your sword!)



(Hela. The path to Hela.)



(Senua, turn back! It’s too dangerous.)



(Wait. What? What happens when she dies? What happens to us? We die too. I don’t want to die.)



We’ll all die someday. And once everyone’s gone, even the gods will die.



(We don’t want to die. Senua. Stop! Turn back! Stop her!)



I’m sorry. I didn’t ask you to be a part of me. If you don’t want to die with me, then leave me alone.



(I don’t want to die! Please stop!)



(Please stop. You’ll never come back if you go there.)



There’s nothing to go back to.



(We only have each other now. Don’t abandon me.)



Everyone suffers. They were right about me.



(Senua. Listen to me. Not them.)



(They were afraid. Like children scared of the dark.)



So was I.



(They made up monsters to fill the void. That doesn’t make them real.)



They made them real.



(No!)



(No! Don’t leave me! Please!)



Zynbel:

Hollow your soul and let go of the Senua of old for there lies your weakness. And the darkness will find it.



(Come back!)



Narrator:

It’s not like the old stories, is it? The noble warrior facing evil in search of victory and honour. Clear dividing lines.



No, this place is not quite like that. It’s as if it knows that true torment lies within: memories you cannot defeat, cannot escape.



This is her Hel.



Galena:

Turn away Senua.



Senua:

Mother!



Galena:

Don’t see me like this. Don’t look at me.



Don’t look at me.



Turn away Senua! Ahhhhhh!



Zynbel:

Do you see it, Senua? Do you see the darkness?



The faces of fear and suffering.



You can see it.



Senua:

I remember it clearly now.



Zynbel:

She has nothing to fear anymore. The gods have saved your mother through my hands.



Senua:

You killed her.



Zynbel:

It is the will of the gods.



Senua:

Fuck the gods! You did this to her. Why?



Zynbel:

This is what happens when you listen to the voices of the underworld. They crawl into your soul and rot you from the inside.



Defy the gods like your mother, and the darkness will come for you too.



Do you understand, Senua?



Senua:

I do understand. You cursed me with your own madness!



I was just a child...



You created this darkness!



You created this darkness, so you could hide behind it.



Zynbel:

Only suffering brings salvation. It is the way of the gods.



Senua:

It was all a lie.



You are a lie!



She didn’t defy the gods. She defied you! And so you killed her.



Zynbel:

You didn’t pray to the gods. You prayed to your mother.



Your mother, who was too weak to fight the darkness and abandoned you.



Senua:

You tortured her! You killed her. You are the darkness! You would have killed me too! Now I know what you are, I won’t let you hurt me anymore!



Zynbel:

Those rituals. The years of isolation. The pain that still haunts you. It was the only way to fight the curse within you.



The darkness is inside you and it will destroy you!



Senua:

You’re a liar!



Zynbel:

No Senua. The darkness is here. You cannot wish it away. And it will watch as you draw your last dying gasp.



Senua:

I won’t let you kill me!



I can see through your darkness! You’re a liar and a murderer!



And if you really are Hela, then I have a sword here that can kill a god!



Zynbel:

Look at you. Running forward but moving backwards to wallow in your miserable past.



You’re making a mistake searching for Dillion. The same mistake that killed him in the first place.



Senua:

You took him from me! You’re a liar!



Zynbel:

I am trying to save you from yourself.



Do you still believe it is a lie? The plague of darkness? The butchering of Dillion by the northmen? You saw it yourself.



Senua:

You told everyone I was cursed! They believed you! I believed you!



Zynbel:

Tell me Senua, where is Dillion’s soul if the darkness is a lie? How will you save him?



Senua:

He’s here. I know he’s here!



Dillion! I know you’re here. Hold on! I’ll find you!



Dillion! Where is he?



You’re trying to trick me again with your lies! I know he’s here! You took him from me. You have him!



Zynbel:

Dillion is gone. Dillion is dead. Let him go now.



I’m warning you.



Senua:

Or what??? What can you do to me that you haven’t already!?



Fight me! Come on!



Zynbel:

You betrayed your own father, you betrayed the gods. In search of Dillion. In search of love. Look where that’s got you.



Let go of your battle. Let go of redemption. Let go of Dillion.



Don’t let your darkness hurt anyone else.



Senua:

If you are a lie. And there is no darkness. Then you never took him from me, did you?



And I can’t save Dillion.



Is that what you want me to believe? After all you have done to me?! To him?



You’re not a lie. But you are a liar. You’ve crawled into me, to confuse and deceive me. But I know he’s here. I know you have him.



I will give you my life. That’s what you want isn’t it? My soul.



Take it! I’ll be your...I’ll be your slave warrior. I’ll fight with you at Ragnarok... if you release him.



But if you won’t then you will have to kill me because I have nothing left. No fear. No hate. No quest. Nothing.



And you have no power over me.



Dillion:

I learnt the hard way to not be afraid of death, Senua. Because a life without loss is one without love.



You turn your back on death... and only you can see is the shadow that it casts.



The longer you hide from it, the longer the shadow grows until, all you can see is darkness.



When our time comes, we must look death in the eye, and embrace it as a friend. Only then can we let go of fear, and emerge from our darkness.



Narrator:

Never forget what it is like to see the world as a child, Senua.



Every autumn leaf is like a work of art.



Every rolling cloud a moving picture.



Every day a new story.



We too emerge from this magic, like a wave from the ocean, only to return back to the sea.



Senua:

Good bye my love.



Narrator:

Do not mourn the waves, the leaves and clouds. Even in darkness, the wonder and the beauty of this world, never leaves us, it is always there, waiting to be seen again.



(We’re still here. She’s still here. Hello. Hello?)



(Oh, oh no. It’s...it’s the rot. The darkness is coming.)



(Wait! Wait! Wait! What is it? It feels... It’s different. It’s okay. Is it okay?)



This is where my story once began. And so it has to end here. Because I cannot see further than this.



Senua:

Follow us. We have another story to tell.



Narrator:

My friend. Go with her.



This now will be your story to witness.



Good bye.